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Maarten van Heemskerck (Heemskerk 1498 - 1574 Haarlem), Portrait of a Gentleman in a Fur-lined Cloak. photo courtesy Sotheby's

oil on panel, 19 1/2 by 15 in.; 49.5 by 38.1 cm.19 1/2 by 15 in.; 49.5 by 38.1 cm. Estimate 100,000—150,000 USD. Lot Sold 158,500 USD

PROVENANCE: With Perls, Berlin, in the 1920s;
With D.A. Hoogendijk & Co., Amsterdam, 1929;
From whom acquired by Dr. A.F. Philips, Eindhoven;
Thence by descent until offered for sale, "The Property of a Distinguished European Collector," London, Christie's, 8 December 2005, lot 34, where unsold;
Acquired by the present owners after the sale.

EXHIBITED: Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, Tentoonstelling van Oude Kunst door de Vereeniging van Handelaren in Oude Kunst Nederland, 1929, no. 130, as Jan van Scorel.

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES; L. Baldass, "Bildnisse des niederländische Romanismus," in Städel-Jahrbuch (1930): p. 83, reproduced fig. XIXa, as Jan van Scorel;
A.B. de Vries, Het Noord-Nederlandsch portret in de tweede helft van de 16e eeuw door, Amsterdam 1934, p. 22, no. 130, as Jan van Scorel;
P. Wescher, "Heemskerck und Scorel," in Jahrbuch der Preussischen Kunstsammlungen, vol. 59 (1938): pp. 244ff, reproduced fig. 7, as Maarten van Heemskerck;
C.H. de Jonge, "Jan van Scorel," in Niederländische Malerei im 15. und 16. Jahrhundert, Amsterdam 1941, p. 356, reproduced fig. 308, as Jan van Scorel;
G.J. Hoogewerff, De Noord-Nederlandsche Schilderkunst, s'-Gravenhage 1936-1947, vol. 4, pp. 335ff, reproduced fig. 156; vol. 5, p. 158, no. 60;
J. Bruyn, "Vroege portretten van Maerten van Heemskerck," in Bulletin van het Rijksmuseum, vol. 3 (1955): p. 33, note 3, as Maarten van Heemskerck;
K.G. Boon, "Rondom Aertgen," in Miscellanea J.Q. van Regteren Altena, Amsterdam 1969, p. 60, as Maarten van Heemskerck;
M.J. Friedländer, Early Netherlandish Painting, XII, Leiden and Brussels 1975, p. 127, no. 365, reproduced pl. 194, as Jan van Scorel;
R. Grosshans, Maerten van Heemskerck, Die Gemälde, Berlin 1980, pp. 104-105, no. 13, reproduced pl. 13. as Maarten van Heemskerck.

NOTE: First published as a work of Jan van Scorel by Baldass in 1930, the present work has since been identified as an autograph work by Scorel's pupil, Maarten van Heemskerck. Although Friedländer still endorsed the attribution to Scorel as late as the 1975 edition of his Early Netherlandish Painting, Rainald Grosshans published it as an early work of van Heemskerck, dating it to circa 1530, in his authoritative 1980 monograph, and the attribution has remained intact since.

It is easy to understand the confusion over the attribution of this work, as Heemskerck was eager to absorb the lessons and style of his teacher. He entered Scorel's workshop in Haarlem shortly after the older artist had returned from his trip to Italy, a trip which had a profound influence not only on his own art, but which also profoundly affected the course of Northern painting in general. One need only compare Scorel's Portrait of a Man of circa 1535 in the Staatliche Museum, Berlin (fig. 1) with this painting to see the influence the one artist had upon the other. Heemskerck embarked on his own Roman sojourn in 1532 and was as influenced by the art that he saw there as was his master. Upon his return to Haarlem, Heemskerck received many important commissions and his productivity, erudition and inventiveness made him one of the most influential artists of his generation.

The present work depicts a handsome man, in early middle-age, dressed in a black beret, a black jacket with a small, fine white collar and rich fur cloak. He stares off to the right, with a determined, thoughtful expression. In his right hand he holds what appears to be a shallow cup or dish. Behind him is an extensive mountainous landscape with a distant mountain-top city or fortress, shrubbery and two figures on a path. Although it is unclear what this man's

Sotheby's. Important Old Master Paintings & Sculpture, 27 Jan 11, New York www.sothebys.com

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Maarten van Heemskerck (Heemskerk 1498 - 1574 Haarlem), Portrait of a Gentleman in a Fur-lined Cloak. photo courtesy Sotheby's

oil on panel, 19 1/2 by 15 in.; 49.5 by 38.1 cm.19 1/2 by 15 in.; 49.5 by 38.1 cm. Estimate 100,000—150,000 USD. Lot Sold 158,500 USD

PROVENANCE: With Perls, Berlin, in the 1920s;
With D.A. Hoogendijk & Co., Amsterdam, 1929;
From whom acquired by Dr. A.F. Philips, Eindhoven;
Thence by descent until offered for sale, "The Property of a Distinguished European Collector," London, Christie's, 8 December 2005, lot 34, where unsold;
Acquired by the present owners after the sale.

EXHIBITED: Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, Tentoonstelling van Oude Kunst door de Vereeniging van Handelaren in Oude Kunst Nederland, 1929, no. 130, as Jan van Scorel.

LITERATURE AND REFERENCES; L. Baldass, "Bildnisse des niederländische Romanismus," in Städel-Jahrbuch (1930): p. 83, reproduced fig. XIXa, as Jan van Scorel;
A.B. de Vries, Het Noord-Nederlandsch portret in de tweede helft van de 16e eeuw door, Amsterdam 1934, p. 22, no. 130, as Jan van Scorel;
P. Wescher, "Heemskerck und Scorel," in Jahrbuch der Preussischen Kunstsammlungen, vol. 59 (1938): pp. 244ff, reproduced fig. 7, as Maarten van Heemskerck;
C.H. de Jonge, "Jan van Scorel," in Niederländische Malerei im 15. und 16. Jahrhundert, Amsterdam 1941, p. 356, reproduced fig. 308, as Jan van Scorel;
G.J. Hoogewerff, De Noord-Nederlandsche Schilderkunst, s'-Gravenhage 1936-1947, vol. 4, pp. 335ff, reproduced fig. 156; vol. 5, p. 158, no. 60;
J. Bruyn, "Vroege portretten van Maerten van Heemskerck," in Bulletin van het Rijksmuseum, vol. 3 (1955): p. 33, note 3, as Maarten van Heemskerck;
K.G. Boon, "Rondom Aertgen," in Miscellanea J.Q. van Regteren Altena, Amsterdam 1969, p. 60, as Maarten van Heemskerck;
M.J. Friedländer, Early Netherlandish Painting, XII, Leiden and Brussels 1975, p. 127, no. 365, reproduced pl. 194, as Jan van Scorel;
R. Grosshans, Maerten van Heemskerck, Die Gemälde, Berlin 1980, pp. 104-105, no. 13, reproduced pl. 13. as Maarten van Heemskerck.

NOTE: First published as a work of Jan van Scorel by Baldass in 1930, the present work has since been identified as an autograph work by Scorel's pupil, Maarten van Heemskerck. Although Friedländer still endorsed the attribution to Scorel as late as the 1975 edition of his Early Netherlandish Painting, Rainald Grosshans published it as an early work of van Heemskerck, dating it to circa 1530, in his authoritative 1980 monograph, and the attribution has remained intact since.

It is easy to understand the confusion over the attribution of this work, as Heemskerck was eager to absorb the lessons and style of his teacher. He entered Scorel's workshop in Haarlem shortly after the older artist had returned from his trip to Italy, a trip which had a profound influence not only on his own art, but which also profoundly affected the course of Northern painting in general. One need only compare Scorel's Portrait of a Man of circa 1535 in the Staatliche Museum, Berlin (fig. 1) with this painting to see the influence the one artist had upon the other. Heemskerck embarked on his own Roman sojourn in 1532 and was as influenced by the art that he saw there as was his master. Upon his return to Haarlem, Heemskerck received many important commissions and his productivity, erudition and inventiveness made him one of the most influential artists of his generation.

The present work depicts a handsome man, in early middle-age, dressed in a black beret, a black jacket with a small, fine white collar and rich fur cloak. He stares off to the right, with a determined, thoughtful expression. In his right hand he holds what appears to be a shallow cup or dish. Behind him is an extensive mountainous landscape with a distant mountain-top city or fortress, shrubbery and two figures on a path. Although it is unclear what this man's

Sotheby's. Important Old Master Paintings & Sculpture, 27 Jan 11, New York www.sothebys.com